Capitol Reef National Park

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July 2017: Capitol Gorge, Capitol Reef National Park, UT

Capitol Reef National Park was established in 1971, although it had been a National Monument since 1937. It officially opened to the public in 1950, but easy road access did not exist until 1962, when State Route 24 was completed. The park is long and narrow covering 60 miles north to south, but never stretching more than six miles east to west.

The majority of the nearly 100 mile long up-thrust formation called the Waterpocket Fold—a rocky spine extending from Thousand Lake Mountain to Lake Powell—is preserved within the park. "Waterpockets" are small depressions formed in the sandstone layers as they are eroded by water, and are common throughout the fold at Capitol Reef.

The small town of Fruita, inside the park, has more than 2,500 fruit trees some of which were originally planted by Mormon pioneers. Today the town is federally owned and visitors can stroll through the orchards and eat fruit fresh off the trees.

In April 2015, the Park was named a Gold-tier International Dark Sky Park by the International Dark Sky Association.

©Rich Beckman

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July 2017: Unnamed Arch, Capitol Gorge, Capitol Reef National Park, UT

Capitol Reef National Park was established in 1971, although it had been a National Monument since 1937. It officially opened to the public in 1950, but easy road access did not exist until 1962, when State Route 24 was completed. The park is long and narrow covering 60 miles north to south, but never stretching more than six miles east to west.

The majority of the nearly 100 mile long up-thrust formation called the Waterpocket Fold—a rocky spine extending from Thousand Lake Mountain to Lake Powell—is preserved within the park. "Waterpockets" are small depressions formed in the sandstone layers as they are eroded by water, and are common throughout the fold at Capitol Reef.

The small town of Fruita, inside the park, has more than 2,500 fruit trees some of which were originally planted by Mormon pioneers. Today the town is federally owned and visitors can stroll through the orchards and eat fruit fresh off the trees.

In April 2015, the Park was named a Gold-tier International Dark Sky Park by the International Dark Sky Association.

©Rich Beckman

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July 2017: Unnamed Formation, Capitol Gorge, Capitol Reef National Park, UT

Capitol Reef National Park was established in 1971, although it had been a National Monument since 1937. It officially opened to the public in 1950, but easy road access did not exist until 1962, when State Route 24 was completed. The park is long and narrow covering 60 miles north to south, but never stretching more than six miles east to west.

The majority of the nearly 100 mile long up-thrust formation called the Waterpocket Fold—a rocky spine extending from Thousand Lake Mountain to Lake Powell—is preserved within the park. "Waterpockets" are small depressions formed in the sandstone layers as they are eroded by water, and are common throughout the fold at Capitol Reef.

The small town of Fruita, inside the park, has more than 2,500 fruit trees some of which were originally planted by Mormon pioneers. Today the town is federally owned and visitors can stroll through the orchards and eat fruit fresh off the trees.

In April 2015, the Park was named a Gold-tier International Dark Sky Park by the International Dark Sky Association.

©Rich Beckman

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July 2017: Unnamed Formation, Capitol Gorge, Capitol Reef National Park, UT

Capitol Reef National Park was established in 1971, although it had been a National Monument since 1937. It officially opened to the public in 1950, but easy road access did not exist until 1962, when State Route 24 was completed. The park is long and narrow covering 60 miles north to south, but never stretching more than six miles east to west.

The majority of the nearly 100 mile long up-thrust formation called the Waterpocket Fold—a rocky spine extending from Thousand Lake Mountain to Lake Powell—is preserved within the park. "Waterpockets" are small depressions formed in the sandstone layers as they are eroded by water, and are common throughout the fold at Capitol Reef.

The small town of Fruita, inside the park, has more than 2,500 fruit trees some of which were originally planted by Mormon pioneers. Today the town is federally owned and visitors can stroll through the orchards and eat fruit fresh off the trees.

In April 2015, the Park was named a Gold-tier International Dark Sky Park by the International Dark Sky Association.

©Rich Beckman

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July 2017: Cassidy Arch, Capitol Reef National Park, UT

Capitol Reef National Park was established in 1971, although it had been a National Monument since 1937. It officially opened to the public in 1950, but easy road access did not exist until 1962, when State Route 24 was completed. The park is long and narrow covering 60 miles north to south, but never stretching more than six miles east to west.

The majority of the nearly 100 mile long up-thrust formation called the Waterpocket Fold—a rocky spine extending from Thousand Lake Mountain to Lake Powell—is preserved within the park. "Waterpockets" are small depressions formed in the sandstone layers as they are eroded by water, and are common throughout the fold at Capitol Reef.

The small town of Fruita, inside the park, has more than 2,500 fruit trees some of which were originally planted by Mormon pioneers. Today the town is federally owned and visitors can stroll through the orchards and eat fruit fresh off the trees.

In April 2015, the Park was named a Gold-tier International Dark Sky Park by the International Dark Sky Association.

©Rich Beckman

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July 2017: Cassidy Arch, Capitol Reef National Park, UT

Capitol Reef National Park was established in 1971, although it had been a National Monument since 1937. It officially opened to the public in 1950, but easy road access did not exist until 1962, when State Route 24 was completed. The park is long and narrow covering 60 miles north to south, but never stretching more than six miles east to west.

The majority of the nearly 100 mile long up-thrust formation called the Waterpocket Fold—a rocky spine extending from Thousand Lake Mountain to Lake Powell—is preserved within the park. "Waterpockets" are small depressions formed in the sandstone layers as they are eroded by water, and are common throughout the fold at Capitol Reef.

The small town of Fruita, inside the park, has more than 2,500 fruit trees some of which were originally planted by Mormon pioneers. Today the town is federally owned and visitors can stroll through the orchards and eat fruit fresh off the trees.

In April 2015, the Park was named a Gold-tier International Dark Sky Park by the International Dark Sky Association.

©Rich Beckman

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July 2017: Rappelling from Cassidy Arch, Capitol Reef National Park, UT

Capitol Reef National Park was established in 1971, although it had been a National Monument since 1937. It officially opened to the public in 1950, but easy road access did not exist until 1962, when State Route 24 was completed. The park is long and narrow covering 60 miles north to south, but never stretching more than six miles east to west.

The majority of the nearly 100 mile long up-thrust formation called the Waterpocket Fold—a rocky spine extending from Thousand Lake Mountain to Lake Powell—is preserved within the park. "Waterpockets" are small depressions formed in the sandstone layers as they are eroded by water, and are common throughout the fold at Capitol Reef.

The small town of Fruita, inside the park, has more than 2,500 fruit trees some of which were originally planted by Mormon pioneers. Today the town is federally owned and visitors can stroll through the orchards and eat fruit fresh off the trees.

In April 2015, the Park was named a Gold-tier International Dark Sky Park by the International Dark Sky Association.

©Rich Beckman

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July 2017: Rappelling from Cassidy Arch, Capitol Reef National Park, UT

Capitol Reef National Park was established in 1971, although it had been a National Monument since 1937. It officially opened to the public in 1950, but easy road access did not exist until 1962, when State Route 24 was completed. The park is long and narrow covering 60 miles north to south, but never stretching more than six miles east to west.

The majority of the nearly 100 mile long up-thrust formation called the Waterpocket Fold—a rocky spine extending from Thousand Lake Mountain to Lake Powell—is preserved within the park. "Waterpockets" are small depressions formed in the sandstone layers as they are eroded by water, and are common throughout the fold at Capitol Reef.

The small town of Fruita, inside the park, has more than 2,500 fruit trees some of which were originally planted by Mormon pioneers. Today the town is federally owned and visitors can stroll through the orchards and eat fruit fresh off the trees.

In April 2015, the Park was named a Gold-tier International Dark Sky Park by the International Dark Sky Association.

©Rich Beckman

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July 2017: Twin Rocks, Capitol Reef National Park, UT

Capitol Reef National Park was established in 1971, although it had been a National Monument since 1937. It officially opened to the public in 1950, but easy road access did not exist until 1962, when State Route 24 was completed. The park is long and narrow covering 60 miles north to south, but never stretching more than six miles east to west.

The majority of the nearly 100 mile long up-thrust formation called the Waterpocket Fold—a rocky spine extending from Thousand Lake Mountain to Lake Powell—is preserved within the park. "Waterpockets" are small depressions formed in the sandstone layers as they are eroded by water, and are common throughout the fold at Capitol Reef.

The small town of Fruita, inside the park, has more than 2,500 fruit trees some of which were originally planted by Mormon pioneers. Today the town is federally owned and visitors can stroll through the orchards and eat fruit fresh off the trees.

In April 2015, the Park was named a Gold-tier International Dark Sky Park by the International Dark Sky Association.

©Rich Beckman

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July 2017: Milky Way over Twin Rocks, Capitol Reef National Park, UT

Capitol Reef National Park was established in 1971, although it had been a National Monument since 1937. It officially opened to the public in 1950, but easy road access did not exist until 1962, when State Route 24 was completed. The park is long and narrow covering 60 miles north to south, but never stretching more than six miles east to west.

The majority of the nearly 100 mile long up-thrust formation called the Waterpocket Fold—a rocky spine extending from Thousand Lake Mountain to Lake Powell—is preserved within the park. "Waterpockets" are small depressions formed in the sandstone layers as they are eroded by water, and are common throughout the fold at Capitol Reef.

The small town of Fruita, inside the park, has more than 2,500 fruit trees some of which were originally planted by Mormon pioneers. Today the town is federally owned and visitors can stroll through the orchards and eat fruit fresh off the trees.

In April 2015, the Park was named a Gold-tier International Dark Sky Park by the International Dark Sky Association.

©Rich Beckman

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July 2017: Hickman Bridge, Capitol Reef National Park, UT

Capitol Reef National Park was established in 1971, although it had been a National Monument since 1937. It officially opened to the public in 1950, but easy road access did not exist until 1962, when State Route 24 was completed. The park is long and narrow covering 60 miles north to south, but never stretching more than six miles east to west.

The majority of the nearly 100 mile long up-thrust formation called the Waterpocket Fold—a rocky spine extending from Thousand Lake Mountain to Lake Powell—is preserved within the park. "Waterpockets" are small depressions formed in the sandstone layers as they are eroded by water, and are common throughout the fold at Capitol Reef.

The small town of Fruita, inside the park, has more than 2,500 fruit trees some of which were originally planted by Mormon pioneers. Today the town is federally owned and visitors can stroll through the orchards and eat fruit fresh off the trees.

In April 2015, the Park was named a Gold-tier International Dark Sky Park by the International Dark Sky Association.

©Rich Beckman

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July 2017: Hickman Bridge, Capitol Reef National Park, UT

Capitol Reef National Park was established in 1971, although it had been a National Monument since 1937. It officially opened to the public in 1950, but easy road access did not exist until 1962, when State Route 24 was completed. The park is long and narrow covering 60 miles north to south, but never stretching more than six miles east to west.

The majority of the nearly 100 mile long up-thrust formation called the Waterpocket Fold—a rocky spine extending from Thousand Lake Mountain to Lake Powell—is preserved within the park. "Waterpockets" are small depressions formed in the sandstone layers as they are eroded by water, and are common throughout the fold at Capitol Reef.

The small town of Fruita, inside the park, has more than 2,500 fruit trees some of which were originally planted by Mormon pioneers. Today the town is federally owned and visitors can stroll through the orchards and eat fruit fresh off the trees.

In April 2015, the Park was named a Gold-tier International Dark Sky Park by the International Dark Sky Association.

©Rich Beckman

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July 2017: Hickman Bridge, Capitol Reef National Park, UT

Capitol Reef National Park was established in 1971, although it had been a National Monument since 1937. It officially opened to the public in 1950, but easy road access did not exist until 1962, when State Route 24 was completed. The park is long and narrow covering 60 miles north to south, but never stretching more than six miles east to west.

The majority of the nearly 100 mile long up-thrust formation called the Waterpocket Fold—a rocky spine extending from Thousand Lake Mountain to Lake Powell—is preserved within the park. "Waterpockets" are small depressions formed in the sandstone layers as they are eroded by water, and are common throughout the fold at Capitol Reef.

The small town of Fruita, inside the park, has more than 2,500 fruit trees some of which were originally planted by Mormon pioneers. Today the town is federally owned and visitors can stroll through the orchards and eat fruit fresh off the trees.

In April 2015, the Park was named a Gold-tier International Dark Sky Park by the International Dark Sky Association.

©Rich Beckman

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