Escalante and Coyote Buttes

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May 2018: Escalante Bridge, Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument, UT

Escalante Bridge (12S 460830 4180679 ), is located in Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument along the south wall of Escalante Canyon off Highway 12. The bridge has a span of 125 feet and is about 100 feet above the river. The path is an unmarked sandy social trail with four river crossings each way. It is possible to walk in the river during dryer seasons, but fording the Escalante River can be hazardous during high-water flows.

Follow the trail for another 15 minutes to reach the cliff face that houses Cliff House Arch (12S 460331 4180821). There's an easily visible granary in the alcove beneath the arch and an accessible pictograph panel below and to the west of it.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2018: Cliff House Arch, Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument, UT

Escalante Bridge (12S 460830 4180679), is located in Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument along the south wall of Escalante Canyon off Highway 12. The bridge has a span of 125 feet and is about 100 feet above the river. The path is an unmarked sandy social trail with four river crossings each way. It is possible to walk in the river during dryer seasons, but fording the Escalante River can be hazardous during high-water flows.

Follow the trail for another 15 minutes to reach the cliff face that houses Cliff House Arch (12S 460331 4180821). There's an easily visible granary in the alcove beneath the arch and an accessible pictograph panel below and to the west of it.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2018: Entrance, Peek-A-Boo Canyon, Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument, UT

To get to the trailhead, turn left onto Dry Fork Road after driving the first 26.3 miles of the washboard known as Hole In The Rock Road. There are actually separate parking lots for two-wheel and four-wheel drive vehicles. We opted for the four-wheel drive lot that is closer to the trailhead, but you have to traverse either a small rock ledge or a short sandy uphill slope to reach it.

Both Peek-A-Boo and Spooky slot canyons require significant scrambling. Most people make a counterclockwise loop starting with Peek-A-Boo and circling back through Spooky. That was our intent as well, but after completing Peek-A-Boo we followed the wrong cairns and ended up at the south entrance to Spooky rather than the intended north entrance. This proved to be problematic as we encountered seven people heading south near the final boulder drop and there was no room to get by such a large group. I'm not sure we could have gotten out that exit anyway as it is a significant climb out of the canyon. We had to turn around and return to the south entrance. After exiting Spooky, you still have a .5 mile steady uphill hike back to the four-wheel drive parking area.

The canyons are quite different and it is worth exploring both after torturing your car to get there. Peek-a-boo is smooth sandstone slot canyon with arches, and requires more climbing whereas Spooky is very narrow slot canyon, with a rock fall that you need to "chimney down" near the north entrance. In sections you can't even squeeze through wearing a fanny pack and walking sticks just get in the way. You'll need your hands as much as your feet to get through these short canyons and larger folks won't make it through Spooky as there are sections that are only 10-12 inches wide.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2018: Arches, Peek-A-Boo Canyon, Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument, UT

To get to the trailhead, turn left onto Dry Fork Road after driving the first 26.3 miles of the washboard known as Hole In The Rock Road. There are actually separate parking lots for two-wheel and four-wheel drive vehicles. We opted for the four-wheel drive lot that is closer to the trailhead, but you have to traverse either a small rock ledge or a short sandy uphill slope to reach it.

Both Peek-A-Boo and Spooky slot canyons require significant scrambling. Most people make a counterclockwise loop starting with Peek-A-Boo and circling back through Spooky. That was our intent as well, but after completing Peek-A-Boo we followed the wrong cairns and ended up at the south entrance to Spooky rather than the intended north entrance. This proved to be problematic as we encountered seven people heading south near the final boulder drop and there was no room to get by such a large group. I'm not sure we could have gotten out that exit anyway as it is a significant climb out of the canyon. We had to turn around and return to the south entrance. After exiting Spooky, you still have a .5 mile steady uphill hike back to the four-wheel drive parking area.

The canyons are quite different and it is worth exploring both after torturing your car to get there. Peek-a-boo is smooth sandstone slot canyon with arches, and requires more climbing whereas Spooky is very narrow slot canyon, with a rock fall that you need to "chimney down" near the north entrance. In sections you can't even squeeze through wearing a fanny pack and walking sticks just get in the way. You'll need your hands as much as your feet to get through these short canyons and larger folks won't make it through Spooky as there are sections that are only 10-12 inches wide.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2018: Arches, Peek-A-Boo Canyon, Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument, UT

To get to the trailhead, turn left onto Dry Fork Road after driving the first 26.3 miles of the washboard known as Hole In The Rock Road. There are actually separate parking lots for two-wheel and four-wheel drive vehicles. We opted for the four-wheel drive lot that is closer to the trailhead, but you have to traverse either a small rock ledge or a short sandy uphill slope to reach it.

Both Peek-A-Boo and Spooky slot canyons require significant scrambling. Most people make a counterclockwise loop starting with Peek-A-Boo and circling back through Spooky. That was our intent as well, but after completing Peek-A-Boo we followed the wrong cairns and ended up at the south entrance to Spooky rather than the intended north entrance. This proved to be problematic as we encountered seven people heading south near the final boulder drop and there was no room to get by such a large group. I'm not sure we could have gotten out that exit anyway as it is a significant climb out of the canyon. We had to turn around and return to the south entrance. After exiting Spooky, you still have a .5 mile steady uphill hike back to the four-wheel drive parking area.

The canyons are quite different and it is worth exploring both after torturing your car to get there. Peek-a-boo is smooth sandstone slot canyon with arches, and requires more climbing whereas Spooky is very narrow slot canyon, with a rock fall that you need to "chimney down" near the north entrance. In sections you can't even squeeze through wearing a fanny pack and walking sticks just get in the way. You'll need your hands as much as your feet to get through these short canyons and larger folks won't make it through Spooky as there are sections that are only 10-12 inches wide.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2018: Peek-A-Boo Canyon, Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument, UT

To get to the trailhead, turn left onto Dry Fork Road after driving the first 26.3 miles of the washboard known as Hole In The Rock Road. There are actually separate parking lots for two-wheel and four-wheel drive vehicles. We opted for the four-wheel drive lot that is closer to the trailhead, but you have to traverse either a small rock ledge or a short sandy uphill slope to reach it.

Both Peek-A-Boo and Spooky slot canyons require significant scrambling. Most people make a counterclockwise loop starting with Peek-A-Boo and circling back through Spooky. That was our intent as well, but after completing Peek-A-Boo we followed the wrong cairns and ended up at the south entrance to Spooky rather than the intended north entrance. This proved to be problematic as we encountered seven people heading south near the final boulder drop and there was no room to get by such a large group. I'm not sure we could have gotten out that exit anyway as it is a significant climb out of the canyon. We had to turn around and return to the south entrance. After exiting Spooky, you still have a .5 mile steady uphill hike back to the four-wheel drive parking area.

The canyons are quite different and it is worth exploring both after torturing your car to get there. Peek-a-boo is smooth sandstone slot canyon with arches, and requires more climbing whereas Spooky is very narrow slot canyon, with a rock fall that you need to "chimney down" near the north entrance. In sections you can't even squeeze through wearing a fanny pack and walking sticks just get in the way. You'll need your hands as much as your feet to get through these short canyons and larger folks won't make it through Spooky as there are sections that are only 10-12 inches wide.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2018: Spooky Canyon, Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument, UT

To get to the trailhead, turn left onto Dry Fork Road after driving the first 26.3 miles of the washboard known as Hole In The Rock Road. There are actually separate parking lots for two-wheel and four-wheel drive vehicles. We opted for the four-wheel drive lot that is closer to the trailhead, but you have to traverse either a small rock ledge or a short sandy uphill slope to reach it.

Both Peek-A-Boo and Spooky slot canyons require significant scrambling. Most people make a counterclockwise loop starting with Peek-A-Boo and circling back through Spooky. That was our intent as well, but after completing Peek-A-Boo we followed the wrong cairns and ended up at the south entrance to Spooky rather than the intended north entrance. This proved to be problematic as we encountered seven people heading south near the final boulder drop and there was no room to get by such a large group. I'm not sure we could have gotten out that exit anyway as it is a significant climb out of the canyon. We had to turn around and return to the south entrance. After exiting Spooky, you still have a .5 mile steady uphill hike back to the four-wheel drive parking area.

The canyons are quite different and it is worth exploring both after torturing your car to get there. Peek-a-boo is smooth sandstone slot canyon with arches, and requires more climbing whereas Spooky is very narrow slot canyon, with a rock fall that you need to "chimney down" near the north entrance. In sections you can't even squeeze through wearing a fanny pack and walking sticks just get in the way. You'll need your hands as much as your feet to get through these short canyons and larger folks won't make it through Spooky as there are sections that are only 10-12 inches wide.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2018: Spooky Canyon, Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument, UT

To get to the trailhead, turn left onto Dry Fork Road after driving the first 26.3 miles of the washboard known as Hole In The Rock Road. There are actually separate parking lots for two-wheel and four-wheel drive vehicles. We opted for the four-wheel drive lot that is closer to the trailhead, but you have to traverse either a small rock ledge or a short sandy uphill slope to reach it.

Both Peek-A-Boo and Spooky slot canyons require significant scrambling. Most people make a counterclockwise loop starting with Peek-A-Boo and circling back through Spooky. That was our intent as well, but after completing Peek-A-Boo we followed the wrong cairns and ended up at the south entrance to Spooky rather than the intended north entrance. This proved to be problematic as we encountered seven people heading south near the final boulder drop and there was no room to get by such a large group. I'm not sure we could have gotten out that exit anyway as it is a significant climb out of the canyon. We had to turn around and return to the south entrance. After exiting Spooky, you still have a .5 mile steady uphill hike back to the four-wheel drive parking area.

The canyons are quite different and it is worth exploring both after torturing your car to get there. Peek-a-boo is smooth sandstone slot canyon with arches, and requires more climbing whereas Spooky is very narrow slot canyon, with a rock fall that you need to "chimney down" near the north entrance. In sections you can't even squeeze through wearing a fanny pack and walking sticks just get in the way. You'll need your hands as much as your feet to get through these short canyons and larger folks won't make it through Spooky as there are sections that are only 10-12 inches wide.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2018: Spooky Canyon, Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument, UT

To get to the trailhead, turn left onto Dry Fork Road after driving the first 26.3 miles of the washboard known as Hole In The Rock Road. There are actually separate parking lots for two-wheel and four-wheel drive vehicles. We opted for the four-wheel drive lot that is closer to the trailhead, but you have to traverse either a small rock ledge or a short sandy uphill slope to reach it.

Both Peek-A-Boo and Spooky slot canyons require significant scrambling. Most people make a counterclockwise loop starting with Peek-A-Boo and circling back through Spooky. That was our intent as well, but after completing Peek-A-Boo we followed the wrong cairns and ended up at the south entrance to Spooky rather than the intended north entrance. This proved to be problematic as we encountered seven people heading south near the final boulder drop and there was no room to get by such a large group. I'm not sure we could have gotten out that exit anyway as it is a significant climb out of the canyon. We had to turn around and return to the south entrance. After exiting Spooky, you still have a .5 mile steady uphill hike back to the four-wheel drive parking area.

The canyons are quite different and it is worth exploring both after torturing your car to get there. Peek-a-boo is smooth sandstone slot canyon with arches, and requires more climbing whereas Spooky is very narrow slot canyon, with a rock fall that you need to "chimney down" near the north entrance. In sections you can't even squeeze through wearing a fanny pack and walking sticks just get in the way. You'll need your hands as much as your feet to get through these short canyons and larger folks won't make it through Spooky as there are sections that are only 10-12 inches wide.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2018: Cottonwood Cove, South Coyote Buttes, AZ

The Coyote Buttes Special Management Area is between Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument and the upper section of the Paria Canyon Wilderness Area - Vermillion Cliffs National Monument. A Coyote Buttes South permit allows access to Cottonwood Cove and Paw Hole. We had two days and had planned to visit both areas, but our plans changed after we won the daily Coyote Buttes North lottery and therefore spent our first afternoon exploring Cottonwood Cove and our second day at The Wave.

The Wave is a sandstone formation of intersecting U-shaped troughs administered by the BLM. The trails to the Wave are not marked, but a guide sheet is provided to permitted hikers that includes photos and waypoints. A permit to the Wave (https://www.thewave.info/CoyoteButtesNorthCode/Permits.html) is highly cherished and not transferable. There are hefty fines for hikers caught in the area without one, although we met three European hikers on the trail and only one had a permit There are also motion-activated cameras along the route, so don't attempt this hike without a permit.

You can get to The Wave trailhead without a specialized vehicle and to the Wave without a guide, but it is much easier with a guide the first time. You will need a high clearance four-wheel drive vehicle to reach Cottonwood Cove and a guide is not required, but it is a large area and having someone who has been there before will help you make better use of your time. We went to both locations with David Swindler, a wonderful young photographer who we first met at McNeil River in Alaska. He runs Action Photo Tours (https://actionphototours.com) out of Kanab, UT and can be reached at: dswindler1@gmail.com. I highly recommend him.

The Wave is an international destination and is certainly worth visiting, but I found the formations in South Coyote Buttes just as interesting. The Wave is in shadow except for mid-day so unless the reflecting pools have water or you happen to have interesting weather on your permit day, most of the photographs look the same and are illuminated with harsh light against bright blue skies.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2018: Fins, Cottonwood Cove, South Coyote Buttes, AZ

The Coyote Buttes Special Management Area is between Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument and the upper section of the Paria Canyon Wilderness Area - Vermillion Cliffs National Monument. A Coyote Buttes South permit allows access to Cottonwood Cove and Paw Hole. We had two days and had planned to visit both areas, but our plans changed after we won the daily Coyote Buttes North lottery and therefore spent our first afternoon exploring Cottonwood Cove and our second day at The Wave.

The Wave is a sandstone formation of intersecting U-shaped troughs administered by the BLM. The trails to the Wave are not marked, but a guide sheet is provided to permitted hikers that includes photos and waypoints. A permit to the Wave (https://www.thewave.info/CoyoteButtesNorthCode/Permits.html) is highly cherished and not transferable. There are hefty fines for hikers caught in the area without one, although we met three European hikers on the trail and only one had a permit There are also motion-activated cameras along the route, so don't attempt this hike without a permit.

You can get to The Wave trailhead without a specialized vehicle and to the Wave without a guide, but it is much easier with a guide the first time. You will need a high clearance four-wheel drive vehicle to reach Cottonwood Cove and a guide is not required, but it is a large area and having someone who has been there before will help you make better use of your time. We went to both locations with David Swindler, a wonderful young photographer who we first met at McNeil River in Alaska. He runs Action Photo Tours (https://actionphototours.com) out of Kanab, UT and can be reached at: dswindler1@gmail.com. I highly recommend him.

The Wave is an international destination and is certainly worth visiting, but I found the formations in South Coyote Buttes just as interesting. The Wave is in shadow except for mid-day so unless the reflecting pools have water or you happen to have interesting weather on your permit day, most of the photographs look the same and are illuminated with harsh light against bright blue skies.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2018: Lizard Rock Under Waxing Gibbous Moon, Cottonwood Cove, South Coyote Buttes, AZ

The Coyote Buttes Special Management Area is between Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument and the upper section of the Paria Canyon Wilderness Area - Vermillion Cliffs National Monument. A Coyote Buttes South permit allows access to Cottonwood Cove and Paw Hole. We had two days and had planned to visit both areas, but our plans changed after we won the daily Coyote Buttes North lottery and therefore spent our first afternoon exploring Cottonwood Cove and our second day at The Wave.

The Wave is a sandstone formation of intersecting U-shaped troughs administered by the BLM. The trails to the Wave are not marked, but a guide sheet is provided to permitted hikers that includes photos and waypoints. A permit to the Wave (https://www.thewave.info/CoyoteButtesNorthCode/Permits.html) is highly cherished and not transferable. There are hefty fines for hikers caught in the area without one, although we met three European hikers on the trail and only one had a permit There are also motion-activated cameras along the route, so don't attempt this hike without a permit.

You can get to The Wave trailhead without a specialized vehicle and to the Wave without a guide, but it is much easier with a guide the first time. You will need a high clearance four-wheel drive vehicle to reach Cottonwood Cove and a guide is not required, but it is a large area and having someone who has been there before will help you make better use of your time. We went to both locations with David Swindler, a wonderful young photographer who we first met at McNeil River in Alaska. He runs Action Photo Tours (https://actionphototours.com) out of Kanab, UT and can be reached at: dswindler1@gmail.com. I highly recommend him.

The Wave is an international destination and is certainly worth visiting, but I found the formations in South Coyote Buttes just as interesting. The Wave is in shadow except for mid-day so unless the reflecting pools have water or you happen to have interesting weather on your permit day, most of the photographs look the same and are illuminated with harsh light against bright blue skies.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2018: Unnamed Arch, Cottonwood Cove, South Coyote Buttes, AZ

The Coyote Buttes Special Management Area is between Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument and the upper section of the Paria Canyon Wilderness Area - Vermillion Cliffs National Monument. A Coyote Buttes South permit allows access to Cottonwood Cove and Paw Hole. We had two days and had planned to visit both areas, but our plans changed after we won the daily Coyote Buttes North lottery and therefore spent our first afternoon exploring Cottonwood Cove and our second day at The Wave.

The Wave is a sandstone formation of intersecting U-shaped troughs administered by the BLM. The trails to the Wave are not marked, but a guide sheet is provided to permitted hikers that includes photos and waypoints. A permit to the Wave (https://www.thewave.info/CoyoteButtesNorthCode/Permits.html) is highly cherished and not transferable. There are hefty fines for hikers caught in the area without one, although we met three European hikers on the trail and only one had a permit There are also motion-activated cameras along the route, so don't attempt this hike without a permit.

You can get to The Wave trailhead without a specialized vehicle and to the Wave without a guide, but it is much easier with a guide the first time. You will need a high clearance four-wheel drive vehicle to reach Cottonwood Cove and a guide is not required, but it is a large area and having someone who has been there before will help you make better use of your time. We went to both locations with David Swindler, a wonderful young photographer who we first met at McNeil River in Alaska. He runs Action Photo Tours (https://actionphototours.com) out of Kanab, UT and can be reached at: dswindler1@gmail.com. I highly recommend him.

The Wave is an international destination and is certainly worth visiting, but I found the formations in South Coyote Buttes just as interesting. The Wave is in shadow except for mid-day so unless the reflecting pools have water or you happen to have interesting weather on your permit day, most of the photographs look the same and are illuminated with harsh light against bright blue skies.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2018: Looking Toward Teepees, Cottonwood Cove, South Coyote Buttes, AZ

The Coyote Buttes Special Management Area is between Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument and the upper section of the Paria Canyon Wilderness Area - Vermillion Cliffs National Monument. A Coyote Buttes South permit allows access to Cottonwood Cove and Paw Hole. We had two days and had planned to visit both areas, but our plans changed after we won the daily Coyote Buttes North lottery and therefore spent our first afternoon exploring Cottonwood Cove and our second day at The Wave.

The Wave is a sandstone formation of intersecting U-shaped troughs administered by the BLM. The trails to the Wave are not marked, but a guide sheet is provided to permitted hikers that includes photos and waypoints. A permit to the Wave (https://www.thewave.info/CoyoteButtesNorthCode/Permits.html) is highly cherished and not transferable. There are hefty fines for hikers caught in the area without one, although we met three European hikers on the trail and only one had a permit There are also motion-activated cameras along the route, so don't attempt this hike without a permit.

You can get to The Wave trailhead without a specialized vehicle and to the Wave without a guide, but it is much easier with a guide the first time. You will need a high clearance four-wheel drive vehicle to reach Cottonwood Cove and a guide is not required, but it is a large area and having someone who has been there before will help you make better use of your time. We went to both locations with David Swindler, a wonderful young photographer who we first met at McNeil River in Alaska. He runs Action Photo Tours (https://actionphototours.com) out of Kanab, UT and can be reached at: dswindler1@gmail.com. I highly recommend him.

The Wave is an international destination and is certainly worth visiting, but I found the formations in South Coyote Buttes just as interesting. The Wave is in shadow except for mid-day so unless the reflecting pools have water or you happen to have interesting weather on your permit day, most of the photographs look the same and are illuminated with harsh light against bright blue skies.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2018: Cottonwood Cove, South Coyote Buttes, AZ

The Coyote Buttes Special Management Area is between Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument and the upper section of the Paria Canyon Wilderness Area - Vermillion Cliffs National Monument. A Coyote Buttes South permit allows access to Cottonwood Cove and Paw Hole. We had two days and had planned to visit both areas, but our plans changed after we won the daily Coyote Buttes North lottery and therefore spent our first afternoon exploring Cottonwood Cove and our second day at The Wave.

The Wave is a sandstone formation of intersecting U-shaped troughs administered by the BLM. The trails to the Wave are not marked, but a guide sheet is provided to permitted hikers that includes photos and waypoints. A permit to the Wave (https://www.thewave.info/CoyoteButtesNorthCode/Permits.html) is highly cherished and not transferable. There are hefty fines for hikers caught in the area without one, although we met three European hikers on the trail and only one had a permit There are also motion-activated cameras along the route, so don't attempt this hike without a permit.

You can get to The Wave trailhead without a specialized vehicle and to the Wave without a guide, but it is much easier with a guide the first time. You will need a high clearance four-wheel drive vehicle to reach Cottonwood Cove and a guide is not required, but it is a large area and having someone who has been there before will help you make better use of your time. We went to both locations with David Swindler, a wonderful young photographer who we first met at McNeil River in Alaska. He runs Action Photo Tours (https://actionphototours.com) out of Kanab, UT and can be reached at: dswindler1@gmail.com. I highly recommend him.

The Wave is an international destination and is certainly worth visiting, but I found the formations in South Coyote Buttes just as interesting. The Wave is in shadow except for mid-day so unless the reflecting pools have water or you happen to have interesting weather on your permit day, most of the photographs look the same and are illuminated with harsh light against bright blue skies.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2018: Cottonwood Cove, South Coyote Buttes, AZ

The Coyote Buttes Special Management Area is between Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument and the upper section of the Paria Canyon Wilderness Area - Vermillion Cliffs National Monument. A Coyote Buttes South permit allows access to Cottonwood Cove and Paw Hole. We had two days and had planned to visit both areas, but our plans changed after we won the daily Coyote Buttes North lottery and therefore spent our first afternoon exploring Cottonwood Cove and our second day at The Wave.

The Wave is a sandstone formation of intersecting U-shaped troughs administered by the BLM. The trails to the Wave are not marked, but a guide sheet is provided to permitted hikers that includes photos and waypoints. A permit to the Wave (https://www.thewave.info/CoyoteButtesNorthCode/Permits.html) is highly cherished and not transferable. There are hefty fines for hikers caught in the area without one, although we met three European hikers on the trail and only one had a permit There are also motion-activated cameras along the route, so don't attempt this hike without a permit.

You can get to The Wave trailhead without a specialized vehicle and to the Wave without a guide, but it is much easier with a guide the first time. You will need a high clearance four-wheel drive vehicle to reach Cottonwood Cove and a guide is not required, but it is a large area and having someone who has been there before will help you make better use of your time. We went to both locations with David Swindler, a wonderful young photographer who we first met at McNeil River in Alaska. He runs Action Photo Tours (https://actionphototours.com) out of Kanab, UT and can be reached at: dswindler1@gmail.com. I highly recommend him.

The Wave is an international destination and is certainly worth visiting, but I found the formations in South Coyote Buttes just as interesting. The Wave is in shadow except for mid-day so unless the reflecting pools have water or you happen to have interesting weather on your permit day, most of the photographs look the same and are illuminated with harsh light against bright blue skies.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2018: Cottonwood Cove, South Coyote Buttes, AZ

The Coyote Buttes Special Management Area is between Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument and the upper section of the Paria Canyon Wilderness Area - Vermillion Cliffs National Monument. A Coyote Buttes South permit allows access to Cottonwood Cove and Paw Hole. We had two days and had planned to visit both areas, but our plans changed after we won the daily Coyote Buttes North lottery and therefore spent our first afternoon exploring Cottonwood Cove and our second day at The Wave.

The Wave is a sandstone formation of intersecting U-shaped troughs administered by the BLM. The trails to the Wave are not marked, but a guide sheet is provided to permitted hikers that includes photos and waypoints. A permit to the Wave (https://www.thewave.info/CoyoteButtesNorthCode/Permits.html) is highly cherished and not transferable. There are hefty fines for hikers caught in the area without one, although we met three European hikers on the trail and only one had a permit There are also motion-activated cameras along the route, so don't attempt this hike without a permit.

You can get to The Wave trailhead without a specialized vehicle and to the Wave without a guide, but it is much easier with a guide the first time. You will need a high clearance four-wheel drive vehicle to reach Cottonwood Cove and a guide is not required, but it is a large area and having someone who has been there before will help you make better use of your time. We went to both locations with David Swindler, a wonderful young photographer who we first met at McNeil River in Alaska. He runs Action Photo Tours (https://actionphototours.com) out of Kanab, UT and can be reached at: dswindler1@gmail.com. I highly recommend him.

The Wave is an international destination and is certainly worth visiting, but I found the formations in South Coyote Buttes just as interesting. The Wave is in shadow except for mid-day so unless the reflecting pools have water or you happen to have interesting weather on your permit day, most of the photographs look the same and are illuminated with harsh light against bright blue skies.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2018: Half & Half Rock, Cottonwood Cove, South Coyote Buttes, AZ

The Coyote Buttes Special Management Area is between Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument and the upper section of the Paria Canyon Wilderness Area - Vermillion Cliffs National Monument. A Coyote Buttes South permit allows access to Cottonwood Cove and Paw Hole. We had two days and had planned to visit both areas, but our plans changed after we won the daily Coyote Buttes North lottery and therefore spent our first afternoon exploring Cottonwood Cove and our second day at The Wave.

The Wave is a sandstone formation of intersecting U-shaped troughs administered by the BLM. The trails to the Wave are not marked, but a guide sheet is provided to permitted hikers that includes photos and waypoints. A permit to the Wave (https://www.thewave.info/CoyoteButtesNorthCode/Permits.html) is highly cherished and not transferable. There are hefty fines for hikers caught in the area without one, although we met three European hikers on the trail and only one had a permit There are also motion-activated cameras along the route, so don't attempt this hike without a permit.

You can get to The Wave trailhead without a specialized vehicle and to the Wave without a guide, but it is much easier with a guide the first time. You will need a high clearance four-wheel drive vehicle to reach Cottonwood Cove and a guide is not required, but it is a large area and having someone who has been there before will help you make better use of your time. We went to both locations with David Swindler, a wonderful young photographer who we first met at McNeil River in Alaska. He runs Action Photo Tours (https://actionphototours.com) out of Kanab, UT and can be reached at: dswindler1@gmail.com. I highly recommend him.

The Wave is an international destination and is certainly worth visiting, but I found the formations in South Coyote Buttes just as interesting. The Wave is in shadow except for mid-day so unless the reflecting pools have water or you happen to have interesting weather on your permit day, most of the photographs look the same and are illuminated with harsh light against bright blue skies.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2018: The Wave, North Coyote Buttes, AZ

The Coyote Buttes Special Management Area is between Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument and the upper section of the Paria Canyon Wilderness Area - Vermillion Cliffs National Monument. A Coyote Buttes South permit allows access to Cottonwood Cove and Paw Hole. We had two days and had planned to visit both areas, but our plans changed after we won the daily Coyote Buttes North lottery and therefore spent our first afternoon exploring Cottonwood Cove and our second day at The Wave.

The Wave is a sandstone formation of intersecting U-shaped troughs administered by the BLM. The trails to the Wave are not marked, but a guide sheet is provided to permitted hikers that includes photos and waypoints. A permit to the Wave (https://www.thewave.info/CoyoteButtesNorthCode/Permits.html) is highly cherished and not transferable. There are hefty fines for hikers caught in the area without one, although we met three European hikers on the trail and only one had a permit There are also motion-activated cameras along the route, so don't attempt this hike without a permit.

You can get to The Wave trailhead without a specialized vehicle and to the Wave without a guide, but it is much easier with a guide the first time. You will need a high clearance four-wheel drive vehicle to reach Cottonwood Cove and a guide is not required, but it is a large area and having someone who has been there before will help you make better use of your time. We went to both locations with David Swindler, a wonderful young photographer who we first met at McNeil River in Alaska. He runs Action Photo Tours (https://actionphototours.com) out of Kanab, UT and can be reached at: dswindler1@gmail.com. I highly recommend him.

The Wave is an international destination and is certainly worth visiting, but I found the formations in South Coyote Buttes just as interesting. The Wave is in shadow except for mid-day so unless the reflecting pools have water or you happen to have interesting weather on your permit day, most of the photographs look the same and are illuminated with harsh light against bright blue skies.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2018: The Wave, North Coyote Buttes, AZ

The Coyote Buttes Special Management Area is between Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument and the upper section of the Paria Canyon Wilderness Area - Vermillion Cliffs National Monument. A Coyote Buttes South permit allows access to Cottonwood Cove and Paw Hole. We had two days and had planned to visit both areas, but our plans changed after we won the daily Coyote Buttes North lottery and therefore spent our first afternoon exploring Cottonwood Cove and our second day at The Wave.

The Wave is a sandstone formation of intersecting U-shaped troughs administered by the BLM. The trails to the Wave are not marked, but a guide sheet is provided to permitted hikers that includes photos and waypoints. A permit to the Wave (https://www.thewave.info/CoyoteButtesNorthCode/Permits.html) is highly cherished and not transferable. There are hefty fines for hikers caught in the area without one, although we met three European hikers on the trail and only one had a permit There are also motion-activated cameras along the route, so don't attempt this hike without a permit.

You can get to The Wave trailhead without a specialized vehicle and to the Wave without a guide, but it is much easier with a guide the first time. You will need a high clearance four-wheel drive vehicle to reach Cottonwood Cove and a guide is not required, but it is a large area and having someone who has been there before will help you make better use of your time. We went to both locations with David Swindler, a wonderful young photographer who we first met at McNeil River in Alaska. He runs Action Photo Tours (https://actionphototours.com) out of Kanab, UT and can be reached at: dswindler1@gmail.com. I highly recommend him.

The Wave is an international destination and is certainly worth visiting, but I found the formations in South Coyote Buttes just as interesting. The Wave is in shadow except for mid-day so unless the reflecting pools have water or you happen to have interesting weather on your permit day, most of the photographs look the same and are illuminated with harsh light against bright blue skies.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2018: The Wave, North Coyote Buttes, AZ

The Coyote Buttes Special Management Area is between Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument and the upper section of the Paria Canyon Wilderness Area - Vermillion Cliffs National Monument. A Coyote Buttes South permit allows access to Cottonwood Cove and Paw Hole. We had two days and had planned to visit both areas, but our plans changed after we won the daily Coyote Buttes North lottery and therefore spent our first afternoon exploring Cottonwood Cove and our second day at The Wave.

The Wave is a sandstone formation of intersecting U-shaped troughs administered by the BLM. The trails to the Wave are not marked, but a guide sheet is provided to permitted hikers that includes photos and waypoints. A permit to the Wave (https://www.thewave.info/CoyoteButtesNorthCode/Permits.html) is highly cherished and not transferable. There are hefty fines for hikers caught in the area without one, although we met three European hikers on the trail and only one had a permit There are also motion-activated cameras along the route, so don't attempt this hike without a permit.

You can get to The Wave trailhead without a specialized vehicle and to the Wave without a guide, but it is much easier with a guide the first time. You will need a high clearance four-wheel drive vehicle to reach Cottonwood Cove and a guide is not required, but it is a large area and having someone who has been there before will help you make better use of your time. We went to both locations with David Swindler, a wonderful young photographer who we first met at McNeil River in Alaska. He runs Action Photo Tours (https://actionphototours.com) out of Kanab, UT and can be reached at: dswindler1@gmail.com. I highly recommend him.

The Wave is an international destination and is certainly worth visiting, but I found the formations in South Coyote Buttes just as interesting. The Wave is in shadow except for mid-day so unless the reflecting pools have water or you happen to have interesting weather on your permit day, most of the photographs look the same and are illuminated with harsh light against bright blue skies.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2018: The Wave, North Coyote Buttes, AZ

The Coyote Buttes Special Management Area is between Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument and the upper section of the Paria Canyon Wilderness Area - Vermillion Cliffs National Monument. A Coyote Buttes South permit allows access to Cottonwood Cove and Paw Hole. We had two days and had planned to visit both areas, but our plans changed after we won the daily Coyote Buttes North lottery and therefore spent our first afternoon exploring Cottonwood Cove and our second day at The Wave.

The Wave is a sandstone formation of intersecting U-shaped troughs administered by the BLM. The trails to the Wave are not marked, but a guide sheet is provided to permitted hikers that includes photos and waypoints. A permit to the Wave (https://www.thewave.info/CoyoteButtesNorthCode/Permits.html) is highly cherished and not transferable. There are hefty fines for hikers caught in the area without one, although we met three European hikers on the trail and only one had a permit There are also motion-activated cameras along the route, so don't attempt this hike without a permit.

You can get to The Wave trailhead without a specialized vehicle and to the Wave without a guide, but it is much easier with a guide the first time. You will need a high clearance four-wheel drive vehicle to reach Cottonwood Cove and a guide is not required, but it is a large area and having someone who has been there before will help you make better use of your time. We went to both locations with David Swindler, a wonderful young photographer who we first met at McNeil River in Alaska. He runs Action Photo Tours (https://actionphototours.com) out of Kanab, UT and can be reached at: dswindler1@gmail.com. I highly recommend him.

The Wave is an international destination and is certainly worth visiting, but I found the formations in South Coyote Buttes just as interesting. The Wave is in shadow except for mid-day so unless the reflecting pools have water or you happen to have interesting weather on your permit day, most of the photographs look the same and are illuminated with harsh light against bright blue skies.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2018: The Wave, North Coyote Buttes, AZ

The Coyote Buttes Special Management Area is between Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument and the upper section of the Paria Canyon Wilderness Area - Vermillion Cliffs National Monument. A Coyote Buttes South permit allows access to Cottonwood Cove and Paw Hole. We had two days and had planned to visit both areas, but our plans changed after we won the daily Coyote Buttes North lottery and therefore spent our first afternoon exploring Cottonwood Cove and our second day at The Wave.

The Wave is a sandstone formation of intersecting U-shaped troughs administered by the BLM. The trails to the Wave are not marked, but a guide sheet is provided to permitted hikers that includes photos and waypoints. A permit to the Wave (https://www.thewave.info/CoyoteButtesNorthCode/Permits.html) is highly cherished and not transferable. There are hefty fines for hikers caught in the area without one, although we met three European hikers on the trail and only one had a permit There are also motion-activated cameras along the route, so don't attempt this hike without a permit.

You can get to The Wave trailhead without a specialized vehicle and to the Wave without a guide, but it is much easier with a guide the first time. You will need a high clearance four-wheel drive vehicle to reach Cottonwood Cove and a guide is not required, but it is a large area and having someone who has been there before will help you make better use of your time. We went to both locations with David Swindler, a wonderful young photographer who we first met at McNeil River in Alaska. He runs Action Photo Tours (https://actionphototours.com) out of Kanab, UT and can be reached at: dswindler1@gmail.com. I highly recommend him.

The Wave is an international destination and is certainly worth visiting, but I found the formations in South Coyote Buttes just as interesting. The Wave is in shadow except for mid-day so unless the reflecting pools have water or you happen to have interesting weather on your permit day, most of the photographs look the same and are illuminated with harsh light against bright blue skies.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2018: The Wave, North Coyote Buttes, AZ

The Coyote Buttes Special Management Area is between Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument and the upper section of the Paria Canyon Wilderness Area - Vermillion Cliffs National Monument. A Coyote Buttes South permit allows access to Cottonwood Cove and Paw Hole. We had two days and had planned to visit both areas, but our plans changed after we won the daily Coyote Buttes North lottery and therefore spent our first afternoon exploring Cottonwood Cove and our second day at The Wave.

The Wave is a sandstone formation of intersecting U-shaped troughs administered by the BLM. The trails to the Wave are not marked, but a guide sheet is provided to permitted hikers that includes photos and waypoints. A permit to the Wave (https://www.thewave.info/CoyoteButtesNorthCode/Permits.html) is highly cherished and not transferable. There are hefty fines for hikers caught in the area without one, although we met three European hikers on the trail and only one had a permit There are also motion-activated cameras along the route, so don't attempt this hike without a permit.

You can get to The Wave trailhead without a specialized vehicle and to the Wave without a guide, but it is much easier with a guide the first time. You will need a high clearance four-wheel drive vehicle to reach Cottonwood Cove and a guide is not required, but it is a large area and having someone who has been there before will help you make better use of your time. We went to both locations with David Swindler, a wonderful young photographer who we first met at McNeil River in Alaska. He runs Action Photo Tours (https://actionphototours.com) out of Kanab, UT and can be reached at: dswindler1@gmail.com. I highly recommend him.

The Wave is an international destination and is certainly worth visiting, but I found the formations in South Coyote Buttes just as interesting. The Wave is in shadow except for mid-day so unless the reflecting pools have water or you happen to have interesting weather on your permit day, most of the photographs look the same and are illuminated with harsh light against bright blue skies.

©Rich Beckman

Slide thumbnail

May 2018: The Wave, North Coyote Buttes, AZ

The Coyote Buttes Special Management Area is between Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument and the upper section of the Paria Canyon Wilderness Area - Vermillion Cliffs National Monument. A Coyote Buttes South permit allows access to Cottonwood Cove and Paw Hole. We had two days and had planned to visit both areas, but our plans changed after we won the daily Coyote Buttes North lottery and therefore spent our first afternoon exploring Cottonwood Cove and our second day at The Wave.

The Wave is a sandstone formation of intersecting U-shaped troughs administered by the BLM. The trails to the Wave are not marked, but a guide sheet is provided to permitted hikers that includes photos and waypoints. A permit to the Wave (https://www.thewave.info/CoyoteButtesNorthCode/Permits.html) is highly cherished and not transferable. There are hefty fines for hikers caught in the area without one, although we met three European hikers on the trail and only one had a permit There are also motion-activated cameras along the route, so don't attempt this hike without a permit.

You can get to The Wave trailhead without a specialized vehicle and to the Wave without a guide, but it is much easier with a guide the first time. You will need a high clearance four-wheel drive vehicle to reach Cottonwood Cove and a guide is not required, but it is a large area and having someone who has been there before will help you make better use of your time. We went to both locations with David Swindler, a wonderful young photographer who we first met at McNeil River in Alaska. He runs Action Photo Tours (https://actionphototours.com) out of Kanab, UT and can be reached at: dswindler1@gmail.com. I highly recommend him.

The Wave is an international destination and is certainly worth visiting, but I found the formations in South Coyote Buttes just as interesting. The Wave is in shadow except for mid-day so unless the reflecting pools have water or you happen to have interesting weather on your permit day, most of the photographs look the same and are illuminated with harsh light against bright blue skies.

©Rich Beckman

Slide thumbnail

May 2018: The Wave, North Coyote Buttes, AZ

The Coyote Buttes Special Management Area is between Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument and the upper section of the Paria Canyon Wilderness Area - Vermillion Cliffs National Monument. A Coyote Buttes South permit allows access to Cottonwood Cove and Paw Hole. We had two days and had planned to visit both areas, but our plans changed after we won the daily Coyote Buttes North lottery and therefore spent our first afternoon exploring Cottonwood Cove and our second day at The Wave.

The Wave is a sandstone formation of intersecting U-shaped troughs administered by the BLM. The trails to the Wave are not marked, but a guide sheet is provided to permitted hikers that includes photos and waypoints. A permit to the Wave (https://www.thewave.info/CoyoteButtesNorthCode/Permits.html) is highly cherished and not transferable. There are hefty fines for hikers caught in the area without one, although we met three European hikers on the trail and only one had a permit There are also motion-activated cameras along the route, so don't attempt this hike without a permit.

You can get to The Wave trailhead without a specialized vehicle and to the Wave without a guide, but it is much easier with a guide the first time. You will need a high clearance four-wheel drive vehicle to reach Cottonwood Cove and a guide is not required, but it is a large area and having someone who has been there before will help you make better use of your time. We went to both locations with David Swindler, a wonderful young photographer who we first met at McNeil River in Alaska. He runs Action Photo Tours (https://actionphototours.com) out of Kanab, UT and can be reached at: dswindler1@gmail.com. I highly recommend him.

The Wave is an international destination and is certainly worth visiting, but I found the formations in South Coyote Buttes just as interesting. The Wave is in shadow except for mid-day so unless the reflecting pools have water or you happen to have interesting weather on your permit day, most of the photographs look the same and are illuminated with harsh light against bright blue skies.

©Rich Beckman

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