Valley of Fire

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May 2017: Valley of Fire State Park, NV

I don’t have a favorite National Park, a favorite place I’ve been or a favorite photograph that I’ve taken, but I do have places that I never tire of and am always challenged by and one of those is Valley of Fire State Park, located an hour northeast of Las Vegas’ McCarran International Airport. I’ve only been to the Park three times and still don't know my way around very well, but it’s a place where you are free to roam, explore and discover and a place where light interacts with nature and constantly alters your perception.

Valley of Fire is Nevada’s oldest and largest State Park and features approximately 45,000 acres of Mesozoic Era red sandstone formations. It’s the kind of place where if you stop only at the marked attractions along the Park’s two roads, you’ll miss the real beauty of the place. If you can imagine a heaven for natural arches, this is what it would look like. It’s the site of the once secretive Windstone Arch, immortalized by David Muench, who worked for Arizona Highways magazine for more than 50 years and inspired us all. The location of the fragile small arch within a cave was kept secret for years until the coordinates were published on the Internet.

There are named and unnamed formations and arches, some with multiple names and some so remote that you can imagine they’ve never been seen before and therefore name them yourself. Of course, with a little research you can find GPS coordinates for almost everything in the Park, but often it’s more fun to imagine being a member of the Civilian Conservation Corps marking new trails in the 1930s.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2017: Valley of Fire State Park, NV

I don’t have a favorite National Park, a favorite place I’ve been or a favorite photograph that I’ve taken, but I do have places that I never tire of and am always challenged by and one of those is Valley of Fire State Park, located an hour northeast of Las Vegas’ McCarran International Airport. I’ve only been to the Park three times and still don't know my way around very well, but it’s a place where you are free to roam, explore and discover and a place where light interacts with nature and constantly alters your perception.

Valley of Fire is Nevada’s oldest and largest State Park and features approximately 45,000 acres of Mesozoic Era red sandstone formations. It’s the kind of place where if you stop only at the marked attractions along the Park’s two roads, you’ll miss the real beauty of the place. If you can imagine a heaven for natural arches, this is what it would look like. It’s the site of the once secretive Windstone Arch, immortalized by David Muench, who worked for Arizona Highways magazine for more than 50 years and inspired us all. The location of the fragile small arch within a cave was kept secret for years until the coordinates were published on the Internet.

There are named and unnamed formations and arches, some with multiple names and some so remote that you can imagine they’ve never been seen before and therefore name them yourself. Of course, with a little research you can find GPS coordinates for almost everything in the Park, but often it’s more fun to imagine being a member of the Civilian Conservation Corps marking new trails in the 1930s.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2017: Fire Cave, Fire of Valley State Park, NV

I don’t have a favorite National Park, a favorite place I’ve been or a favorite photograph that I’ve taken, but I do have places that I never tire of and am always challenged by and one of those is Valley of Fire State Park, located an hour northeast of Las Vegas’ McCarran International Airport. I’ve only been to the Park three times and still don't know my way around very well, but it’s a place where you are free to roam, explore and discover and a place where light interacts with nature and constantly alters your perception.

Valley of Fire is Nevada’s oldest and largest State Park and features approximately 45,000 acres of Mesozoic Era red sandstone formations. It’s the kind of place where if you stop only at the marked attractions along the Park’s two roads, you’ll miss the real beauty of the place. If you can imagine a heaven for natural arches, this is what it would look like. It’s the site of the once secretive Windstone Arch, immortalized by David Muench, who worked for Arizona Highways magazine for more than 50 years and inspired us all. The location of the fragile small arch within a cave was kept secret for years until the coordinates were published on the Internet.

There are named and unnamed formations and arches, some with multiple names and some so remote that you can imagine they’ve never been seen before and therefore name them yourself. Of course, with a little research you can find GPS coordinates for almost everything in the Park, but often it’s more fun to imagine being a member of the Civilian Conservation Corps marking new trails in the 1930s.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2017: Valley of Fire State Park, NV

I don’t have a favorite National Park, a favorite place I’ve been or a favorite photograph that I’ve taken, but I do have places that I never tire of and am always challenged by and one of those is Valley of Fire State Park, located an hour northeast of Las Vegas’ McCarran International Airport. I’ve only been to the Park three times and still don't know my way around very well, but it’s a place where you are free to roam, explore and discover and a place where light interacts with nature and constantly alters your perception.

Valley of Fire is Nevada’s oldest and largest State Park and features approximately 45,000 acres of Mesozoic Era red sandstone formations. It’s the kind of place where if you stop only at the marked attractions along the Park’s two roads, you’ll miss the real beauty of the place. If you can imagine a heaven for natural arches, this is what it would look like. It’s the site of the once secretive Windstone Arch, immortalized by David Muench, who worked for Arizona Highways magazine for more than 50 years and inspired us all. The location of the fragile small arch within a cave was kept secret for years until the coordinates were published on the Internet.

There are named and unnamed formations and arches, some with multiple names and some so remote that you can imagine they’ve never been seen before and therefore name them yourself. Of course, with a little research you can find GPS coordinates for almost everything in the Park, but often it’s more fun to imagine being a member of the Civilian Conservation Corps marking new trails in the 1930s.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2017: Valley of Fire State Park, NV

I don’t have a favorite National Park, a favorite place I’ve been or a favorite photograph that I’ve taken, but I do have places that I never tire of and am always challenged by and one of those is Valley of Fire State Park, located an hour northeast of Las Vegas’ McCarran International Airport. I’ve only been to the Park three times and still don't know my way around very well, but it’s a place where you are free to roam, explore and discover and a place where light interacts with nature and constantly alters your perception.

Valley of Fire is Nevada’s oldest and largest State Park and features approximately 45,000 acres of Mesozoic Era red sandstone formations. It’s the kind of place where if you stop only at the marked attractions along the Park’s two roads, you’ll miss the real beauty of the place. If you can imagine a heaven for natural arches, this is what it would look like. It’s the site of the once secretive Windstone Arch, immortalized by David Muench, who worked for Arizona Highways magazine for more than 50 years and inspired us all. The location of the fragile small arch within a cave was kept secret for years until the coordinates were published on the Internet.

There are named and unnamed formations and arches, some with multiple names and some so remote that you can imagine they’ve never been seen before and therefore name them yourself. Of course, with a little research you can find GPS coordinates for almost everything in the Park, but often it’s more fun to imagine being a member of the Civilian Conservation Corps marking new trails in the 1930s.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2017: Valley of Fire State Park, NV

I don’t have a favorite National Park, a favorite place I’ve been or a favorite photograph that I’ve taken, but I do have places that I never tire of and am always challenged by and one of those is Valley of Fire State Park, located an hour northeast of Las Vegas’ McCarran International Airport. I’ve only been to the Park three times and still don't know my way around very well, but it’s a place where you are free to roam, explore and discover and a place where light interacts with nature and constantly alters your perception.

Valley of Fire is Nevada’s oldest and largest State Park and features approximately 45,000 acres of Mesozoic Era red sandstone formations. It’s the kind of place where if you stop only at the marked attractions along the Park’s two roads, you’ll miss the real beauty of the place. If you can imagine a heaven for natural arches, this is what it would look like. It’s the site of the once secretive Windstone Arch, immortalized by David Muench, who worked for Arizona Highways magazine for more than 50 years and inspired us all. The location of the fragile small arch within a cave was kept secret for years until the coordinates were published on the Internet.

There are named and unnamed formations and arches, some with multiple names and some so remote that you can imagine they’ve never been seen before and therefore name them yourself. Of course, with a little research you can find GPS coordinates for almost everything in the Park, but often it’s more fun to imagine being a member of the Civilian Conservation Corps marking new trails in the 1930s.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2017: Valley of Fire State Park, NV

I don’t have a favorite National Park, a favorite place I’ve been or a favorite photograph that I’ve taken, but I do have places that I never tire of and am always challenged by and one of those is Valley of Fire State Park, located an hour northeast of Las Vegas’ McCarran International Airport. I’ve only been to the Park three times and still don't know my way around very well, but it’s a place where you are free to roam, explore and discover and a place where light interacts with nature and constantly alters your perception.

Valley of Fire is Nevada’s oldest and largest State Park and features approximately 45,000 acres of Mesozoic Era red sandstone formations. It’s the kind of place where if you stop only at the marked attractions along the Park’s two roads, you’ll miss the real beauty of the place. If you can imagine a heaven for natural arches, this is what it would look like. It’s the site of the once secretive Windstone Arch, immortalized by David Muench, who worked for Arizona Highways magazine for more than 50 years and inspired us all. The location of the fragile small arch within a cave was kept secret for years until the coordinates were published on the Internet.

There are named and unnamed formations and arches, some with multiple names and some so remote that you can imagine they’ve never been seen before and therefore name them yourself. Of course, with a little research you can find GPS coordinates for almost everything in the Park, but often it’s more fun to imagine being a member of the Civilian Conservation Corps marking new trails in the 1930s.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2017: Valley of Fire State Park, NV

I don’t have a favorite National Park, a favorite place I’ve been or a favorite photograph that I’ve taken, but I do have places that I never tire of and am always challenged by and one of those is Valley of Fire State Park, located an hour northeast of Las Vegas’ McCarran International Airport. I’ve only been to the Park three times and still don't know my way around very well, but it’s a place where you are free to roam, explore and discover and a place where light interacts with nature and constantly alters your perception.

Valley of Fire is Nevada’s oldest and largest State Park and features approximately 45,000 acres of Mesozoic Era red sandstone formations. It’s the kind of place where if you stop only at the marked attractions along the Park’s two roads, you’ll miss the real beauty of the place. If you can imagine a heaven for natural arches, this is what it would look like. It’s the site of the once secretive Windstone Arch, immortalized by David Muench, who worked for Arizona Highways magazine for more than 50 years and inspired us all. The location of the fragile small arch within a cave was kept secret for years until the coordinates were published on the Internet.

There are named and unnamed formations and arches, some with multiple names and some so remote that you can imagine they’ve never been seen before and therefore name them yourself. Of course, with a little research you can find GPS coordinates for almost everything in the Park, but often it’s more fun to imagine being a member of the Civilian Conservation Corps marking new trails in the 1930s.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2017: Valley of Fire State Park, NV

I don’t have a favorite National Park, a favorite place I’ve been or a favorite photograph that I’ve taken, but I do have places that I never tire of and am always challenged by and one of those is Valley of Fire State Park, located an hour northeast of Las Vegas’ McCarran International Airport. I’ve only been to the Park three times and still don't know my way around very well, but it’s a place where you are free to roam, explore and discover and a place where light interacts with nature and constantly alters your perception.

Valley of Fire is Nevada’s oldest and largest State Park and features approximately 45,000 acres of Mesozoic Era red sandstone formations. It’s the kind of place where if you stop only at the marked attractions along the Park’s two roads, you’ll miss the real beauty of the place. If you can imagine a heaven for natural arches, this is what it would look like. It’s the site of the once secretive Windstone Arch, immortalized by David Muench, who worked for Arizona Highways magazine for more than 50 years and inspired us all. The location of the fragile small arch within a cave was kept secret for years until the coordinates were published on the Internet.

There are named and unnamed formations and arches, some with multiple names and some so remote that you can imagine they’ve never been seen before and therefore name them yourself. Of course, with a little research you can find GPS coordinates for almost everything in the Park, but often it’s more fun to imagine being a member of the Civilian Conservation Corps marking new trails in the 1930s.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2017: Windstone Arch, Fire of Valley State Park, NV

I don’t have a favorite National Park, a favorite place I’ve been or a favorite photograph that I’ve taken, but I do have places that I never tire of and am always challenged by and one of those is Valley of Fire State Park, located an hour northeast of Las Vegas’ McCarran International Airport. I’ve only been to the Park three times and still don't know my way around very well, but it’s a place where you are free to roam, explore and discover and a place where light interacts with nature and constantly alters your perception.

Valley of Fire is Nevada’s oldest and largest State Park and features approximately 45,000 acres of Mesozoic Era red sandstone formations. It’s the kind of place where if you stop only at the marked attractions along the Park’s two roads, you’ll miss the real beauty of the place. If you can imagine a heaven for natural arches, this is what it would look like. It’s the site of the once secretive Windstone Arch, immortalized by David Muench, who worked for Arizona Highways magazine for more than 50 years and inspired us all. The location of the fragile small arch within a cave was kept secret for years until the coordinates were published on the Internet.

There are named and unnamed formations and arches, some with multiple names and some so remote that you can imagine they’ve never been seen before and therefore name them yourself. Of course, with a little research you can find GPS coordinates for almost everything in the Park, but often it’s more fun to imagine being a member of the Civilian Conservation Corps marking new trails in the 1930s.

©Rich Beckman

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October 2015: Valley of Fire State Park, NV

I don’t have a favorite National Park, a favorite place I’ve been or a favorite photograph that I’ve taken, but I do have places that I never tire of and am always challenged by and one of those is Valley of Fire State Park, located an hour northeast of Las Vegas’ McCarran International Airport. I’ve only been to the Park three times and still don't know my way around very well, but it’s a place where you are free to roam, explore and discover and a place where light interacts with nature and constantly alters your perception.

Valley of Fire is Nevada’s oldest and largest State Park and features approximately 45,000 acres of Mesozoic Era red sandstone formations. It’s the kind of place where if you stop only at the marked attractions along the Park’s two roads, you’ll miss the real beauty of the place. If you can imagine a heaven for natural arches, this is what it would look like. It’s the site of the once secretive Windstone Arch, immortalized by David Muench, who worked for Arizona Highways magazine for more than 50 years and inspired us all. The location of the fragile small arch within a cave was kept secret for years until the coordinates were published on the Internet.

There are named and unnamed formations and arches, some with multiple names and some so remote that you can imagine they’ve never been seen before and therefore name them yourself. Of course, with a little research you can find GPS coordinates for almost everything in the Park, but often it’s more fun to imagine being a member of the Civilian Conservation Corps marking new trails in the 1930s.

©Rich Beckman

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October 2015: Valley of Fire State Park, NV

I don’t have a favorite National Park, a favorite place I’ve been or a favorite photograph that I’ve taken, but I do have places that I never tire of and am always challenged by and one of those is Valley of Fire State Park, located an hour northeast of Las Vegas’ McCarran International Airport. I’ve only been to the Park three times and still don't know my way around very well, but it’s a place where you are free to roam, explore and discover and a place where light interacts with nature and constantly alters your perception.

Valley of Fire is Nevada’s oldest and largest State Park and features approximately 45,000 acres of Mesozoic Era red sandstone formations. It’s the kind of place where if you stop only at the marked attractions along the Park’s two roads, you’ll miss the real beauty of the place. If you can imagine a heaven for natural arches, this is what it would look like. It’s the site of the once secretive Windstone Arch, immortalized by David Muench, who worked for Arizona Highways magazine for more than 50 years and inspired us all. The location of the fragile small arch within a cave was kept secret for years until the coordinates were published on the Internet.

There are named and unnamed formations and arches, some with multiple names and some so remote that you can imagine they’ve never been seen before and therefore name them yourself. Of course, with a little research you can find GPS coordinates for almost everything in the Park, but often it’s more fun to imagine being a member of the Civilian Conservation Corps marking new trails in the 1930s.

©Rich Beckman

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December 2016: Valley of Fire State Park, NV

I don’t have a favorite National Park, a favorite place I’ve been or a favorite photograph that I’ve taken, but I do have places that I never tire of and am always challenged by and one of those is Valley of Fire State Park, located an hour northeast of Las Vegas’ McCarran International Airport. I’ve only been to the Park three times and still don't know my way around very well, but it’s a place where you are free to roam, explore and discover and a place where light interacts with nature and constantly alters your perception.

Valley of Fire is Nevada’s oldest and largest State Park and features approximately 45,000 acres of Mesozoic Era red sandstone formations. It’s the kind of place where if you stop only at the marked attractions along the Park’s two roads, you’ll miss the real beauty of the place. If you can imagine a heaven for natural arches, this is what it would look like. It’s the site of the once secretive Windstone Arch, immortalized by David Muench, who worked for Arizona Highways magazine for more than 50 years and inspired us all. The location of the fragile small arch within a cave was kept secret for years until the coordinates were published on the Internet.

There are named and unnamed formations and arches, some with multiple names and some so remote that you can imagine they’ve never been seen before and therefore name them yourself. Of course, with a little research you can find GPS coordinates for almost everything in the Park, but often it’s more fun to imagine being a member of the Civilian Conservation Corps marking new trails in the 1930s.

©Rich Beckman

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December 2016: Valley of Fire State Park, NV

I don’t have a favorite National Park, a favorite place I’ve been or a favorite photograph that I’ve taken, but I do have places that I never tire of and am always challenged by and one of those is Valley of Fire State Park, located an hour northeast of Las Vegas’ McCarran International Airport. I’ve only been to the Park three times and still don't know my way around very well, but it’s a place where you are free to roam, explore and discover and a place where light interacts with nature and constantly alters your perception.

Valley of Fire is Nevada’s oldest and largest State Park and features approximately 45,000 acres of Mesozoic Era red sandstone formations. It’s the kind of place where if you stop only at the marked attractions along the Park’s two roads, you’ll miss the real beauty of the place. If you can imagine a heaven for natural arches, this is what it would look like. It’s the site of the once secretive Windstone Arch, immortalized by David Muench, who worked for Arizona Highways magazine for more than 50 years and inspired us all. The location of the fragile small arch within a cave was kept secret for years until the coordinates were published on the Internet.

There are named and unnamed formations and arches, some with multiple names and some so remote that you can imagine they’ve never been seen before and therefore name them yourself. Of course, with a little research you can find GPS coordinates for almost everything in the Park, but often it’s more fun to imagine being a member of the Civilian Conservation Corps marking new trails in the 1930s.

©Rich Beckman

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December 2016: Valley of Fire State Park, NV

I don’t have a favorite National Park, a favorite place I’ve been or a favorite photograph that I’ve taken, but I do have places that I never tire of and am always challenged by and one of those is Valley of Fire State Park, located an hour northeast of Las Vegas’ McCarran International Airport. I’ve only been to the Park three times and still don't know my way around very well, but it’s a place where you are free to roam, explore and discover and a place where light interacts with nature and constantly alters your perception.

Valley of Fire is Nevada’s oldest and largest State Park and features approximately 45,000 acres of Mesozoic Era red sandstone formations. It’s the kind of place where if you stop only at the marked attractions along the Park’s two roads, you’ll miss the real beauty of the place. If you can imagine a heaven for natural arches, this is what it would look like. It’s the site of the once secretive Windstone Arch, immortalized by David Muench, who worked for Arizona Highways magazine for more than 50 years and inspired us all. The location of the fragile small arch within a cave was kept secret for years until the coordinates were published on the Internet.

There are named and unnamed formations and arches, some with multiple names and some so remote that you can imagine they’ve never been seen before and therefore name them yourself. Of course, with a little research you can find GPS coordinates for almost everything in the Park, but often it’s more fun to imagine being a member of the Civilian Conservation Corps marking new trails in the 1930s.

©Rich Beckman

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December 2016: Valley of Fire State Park, NV

I don’t have a favorite National Park, a favorite place I’ve been or a favorite photograph that I’ve taken, but I do have places that I never tire of and am always challenged by and one of those is Valley of Fire State Park, located an hour northeast of Las Vegas’ McCarran International Airport. I’ve only been to the Park three times and still don't know my way around very well, but it’s a place where you are free to roam, explore and discover and a place where light interacts with nature and constantly alters your perception.

Valley of Fire is Nevada’s oldest and largest State Park and features approximately 45,000 acres of Mesozoic Era red sandstone formations. It’s the kind of place where if you stop only at the marked attractions along the Park’s two roads, you’ll miss the real beauty of the place. If you can imagine a heaven for natural arches, this is what it would look like. It’s the site of the once secretive Windstone Arch, immortalized by David Muench, who worked for Arizona Highways magazine for more than 50 years and inspired us all. The location of the fragile small arch within a cave was kept secret for years until the coordinates were published on the Internet.

There are named and unnamed formations and arches, some with multiple names and some so remote that you can imagine they’ve never been seen before and therefore name them yourself. Of course, with a little research you can find GPS coordinates for almost everything in the Park, but often it’s more fun to imagine being a member of the Civilian Conservation Corps marking new trails in the 1930s.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2017: Elephant Rock, Valley of Fire State Park, NV

I don’t have a favorite National Park, a favorite place I’ve been or a favorite photograph that I’ve taken, but I do have places that I never tire of and am always challenged by and one of those is Valley of Fire State Park, located an hour northeast of Las Vegas’ McCarran International Airport. I’ve only been to the Park three times and still don't know my way around very well, but it’s a place where you are free to roam, explore and discover and a place where light interacts with nature and constantly alters your perception.

Valley of Fire is Nevada’s oldest and largest State Park and features approximately 45,000 acres of Mesozoic Era red sandstone formations. It’s the kind of place where if you stop only at the marked attractions along the Park’s two roads, you’ll miss the real beauty of the place. If you can imagine a heaven for natural arches, this is what it would look like. It’s the site of the once secretive Windstone Arch, immortalized by David Muench, who worked for Arizona Highways magazine for more than 50 years and inspired us all. The location of the fragile small arch within a cave was kept secret for years until the coordinates were published on the Internet.

There are named and unnamed formations and arches, some with multiple names and some so remote that you can imagine they’ve never been seen before and therefore name them yourself. Of course, with a little research you can find GPS coordinates for almost everything in the Park, but often it’s more fun to imagine being a member of the Civilian Conservation Corps marking new trails in the 1930s.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2017: Valley of Fire State Park, NV

I don’t have a favorite National Park, a favorite place I’ve been or a favorite photograph that I’ve taken, but I do have places that I never tire of and am always challenged by and one of those is Valley of Fire State Park, located an hour northeast of Las Vegas’ McCarran International Airport. I’ve only been to the Park three times and still don't know my way around very well, but it’s a place where you are free to roam, explore and discover and a place where light interacts with nature and constantly alters your perception.

Valley of Fire is Nevada’s oldest and largest State Park and features approximately 45,000 acres of Mesozoic Era red sandstone formations. It’s the kind of place where if you stop only at the marked attractions along the Park’s two roads, you’ll miss the real beauty of the place. If you can imagine a heaven for natural arches, this is what it would look like. It’s the site of the once secretive Windstone Arch, immortalized by David Muench, who worked for Arizona Highways magazine for more than 50 years and inspired us all. The location of the fragile small arch within a cave was kept secret for years until the coordinates were published on the Internet.

There are named and unnamed formations and arches, some with multiple names and some so remote that you can imagine they’ve never been seen before and therefore name them yourself. Of course, with a little research you can find GPS coordinates for almost everything in the Park, but often it’s more fun to imagine being a member of the Civilian Conservation Corps marking new trails in the 1930s.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2017: Valley of Fire State Park, NV

I don’t have a favorite National Park, a favorite place I’ve been or a favorite photograph that I’ve taken, but I do have places that I never tire of and am always challenged by and one of those is Valley of Fire State Park, located an hour northeast of Las Vegas’ McCarran International Airport. I’ve only been to the Park three times and still don't know my way around very well, but it’s a place where you are free to roam, explore and discover and a place where light interacts with nature and constantly alters your perception.

Valley of Fire is Nevada’s oldest and largest State Park and features approximately 45,000 acres of Mesozoic Era red sandstone formations. It’s the kind of place where if you stop only at the marked attractions along the Park’s two roads, you’ll miss the real beauty of the place. If you can imagine a heaven for natural arches, this is what it would look like. It’s the site of the once secretive Windstone Arch, immortalized by David Muench, who worked for Arizona Highways magazine for more than 50 years and inspired us all. The location of the fragile small arch within a cave was kept secret for years until the coordinates were published on the Internet.

There are named and unnamed formations and arches, some with multiple names and some so remote that you can imagine they’ve never been seen before and therefore name them yourself. Of course, with a little research you can find GPS coordinates for almost everything in the Park, but often it’s more fun to imagine being a member of the Civilian Conservation Corps marking new trails in the 1930s.

©Rich Beckman

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May 2017: Milky Way, Seven Sisters, Valley of Fire State Park, NV

I don’t have a favorite National Park, a favorite place I’ve been or a favorite photograph that I’ve taken, but I do have places that I never tire of and am always challenged by and one of those is Valley of Fire State Park, located an hour northeast of Las Vegas’ McCarran International Airport. I’ve only been to the Park three times and still don't know my way around very well, but it’s a place where you are free to roam, explore and discover and a place where light interacts with nature and constantly alters your perception.

Valley of Fire is Nevada’s oldest and largest State Park and features approximately 45,000 acres of Mesozoic Era red sandstone formations. It’s the kind of place where if you stop only at the marked attractions along the Park’s two roads, you’ll miss the real beauty of the place. If you can imagine a heaven for natural arches, this is what it would look like. It’s the site of the once secretive Windstone Arch, immortalized by David Muench, who worked for Arizona Highways magazine for more than 50 years and inspired us all. The location of the fragile small arch within a cave was kept secret for years until the coordinates were published on the Internet.

There are named and unnamed formations and arches, some with multiple names and some so remote that you can imagine they’ve never been seen before and therefore name them yourself. Of course, with a little research you can find GPS coordinates for almost everything in the Park, but often it’s more fun to imagine being a member of the Civilian Conservation Corps marking new trails in the 1930s.

©Rich Beckman

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