Sedimentary Utah

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About 30 miles south of Vernal, Utah, in the midst of a maze of gas and oil fields, lay the ten-acre Fantasy Canyon, an area of unique 40-50 million year old erosional features within the Uinta Basin located on what was the eastern shore of Lake Uinta, now dry, but once nearly 150 miles wide and half a mile deep. (1/3)

©Rich Beckman

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About 30 miles south of Vernal, Utah, in the midst of a maze of gas and oil fields, lay the ten-acre Fantasy Canyon, an area of unique 40-50 million year old erosional features within the Uinta Basin located on what was the eastern shore of Lake Uinta, now dry, but once nearly 150 miles wide and half a mile deep. (2/3)

©Rich Beckman

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About 30 miles south of Vernal, Utah, in the midst of a maze of gas and oil fields, lay the ten-acre Fantasy Canyon, an area of unique 40-50 million year old erosional features within the Uinta Basin located on what was the eastern shore of Lake Uinta, now dry, but once nearly 150 miles wide and half a mile deep. (3/3)

©Rich Beckman

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In April 1929, shortly after his inauguration, President Herbert Hoover signed a presidential proclamation reserving 1,920 acres in the Windows and 2,600 acres in the Devils Garden to establish Arches National Monument. The Park’s boundaries have been expanded several times since then and in 1971, Congress changed the status of Arches to a National Park. The Park contains the world's largest concentration of natural Navajo and Entrada Sandstone arches. In Desert Solitaire: A Season in the Wilderness, Ed Abbey recounts the two seasons (1956 and 1957) he worked as a park ranger at Arches. (1/5)

©Rich Beckman

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In April 1929, shortly after his inauguration, President Herbert Hoover signed a presidential proclamation reserving 1,920 acres in the Windows and 2,600 acres in the Devils Garden to establish Arches National Monument. The Park’s boundaries have been expanded several times since then and in 1971, Congress changed the status of Arches to a National Park. The Park contains the world's largest concentration of natural Navajo and Entrada Sandstone arches. In Desert Solitaire: A Season in the Wilderness, Ed Abbey recounts the two seasons (1956 and 1957) he worked as a park ranger at Arches. (2/5)

©Rich Beckman

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In April 1929, shortly after his inauguration, President Herbert Hoover signed a presidential proclamation reserving 1,920 acres in the Windows and 2,600 acres in the Devils Garden to establish Arches National Monument. The Park’s boundaries have been expanded several times since then and in 1971, Congress changed the status of Arches to a National Park. The Park contains the world's largest concentration of natural Navajo and Entrada Sandstone arches. In Desert Solitaire: A Season in the Wilderness, Ed Abbey recounts the two seasons (1956 and 1957) he worked as a park ranger at Arches. (3/5)

©Rich Beckman

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In April 1929, shortly after his inauguration, President Herbert Hoover signed a presidential proclamation reserving 1,920 acres in the Windows and 2,600 acres in the Devils Garden to establish Arches National Monument. The Park’s boundaries have been expanded several times since then and in 1971, Congress changed the status of Arches to a National Park. The Park contains the world's largest concentration of natural Navajo and Entrada Sandstone arches. In Desert Solitaire: A Season in the Wilderness, Ed Abbey recounts the two seasons (1956 and 1957) he worked as a park ranger at Arches. (4/5)

©Rich Beckman

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In April 1929, shortly after his inauguration, President Herbert Hoover signed a presidential proclamation reserving 1,920 acres in the Windows and 2,600 acres in the Devils Garden to establish Arches National Monument. The Park’s boundaries have been expanded several times since then and in 1971, Congress changed the status of Arches to a National Park. The Park contains the world's largest concentration of natural Navajo and Entrada Sandstone arches. In Desert Solitaire: A Season in the Wilderness, Ed Abbey recounts the two seasons (1956 and 1957) he worked as a park ranger at Arches. (5/5)

©Rich Beckman

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Mesa Arch is in the Island in the Sky District of Canyonlands National Park. The Island in the Sky sits atop a massive 1500-foot mesa, above where the Colorado and Green Rivers wind through the heart of Canyonlands, cutting through layered sandstone to form two deep canyons. Established in 1964, the Park’s original boundaries reflect the result of political compromise. A proposal involving the redesignation of federal lands already held by the National Park Service, the Bureau of Land Management, and the Forest Service; and the acquisition of the Dugout Ranch, owned by The Nature Conservancy, and Utah state trust lands has been proposed.

©Rich Beckman

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Dead Horse Point, in southern Utah, is at the end of a mesa 2,000 feet above the Colorado River, on the edge of Canyonlands National Park in Dead Horse Point State Park. The park includes 5,362 acres of high desert at an altitude of 5,900 feet. The deposition of sediments by ancient oceans, freshwater lakes, streams and wind blown sand dunes created the rock layers seen below the point. According to legend, a band of wild Mustangs was left corralled on the Point before the turn of the 19th century and died of thirst. The park was also the site of the final scene of the 1991 film, Thelma & Louise. (1/2)

©Rich Beckman

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Dead Horse Point, in southern Utah, is at the end of a mesa 2,000 feet above the Colorado River, on the edge of Canyonlands National Park in Dead Horse Point State Park. The park includes 5,362 acres of high desert at an altitude of 5,900 feet. The deposition of sediments by ancient oceans, freshwater lakes, streams and wind blown sand dunes created the rock layers seen below the point. According to legend, a band of wild Mustangs was left corralled on the Point before the turn of the 19th century and died of thirst. The park was also the site of the final scene of the 1991 film, Thelma & Louise. (2/2)

©Rich Beckman

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The Toadstool Hoodoos, featuring the Red Toadstool, are part of the Paria Rimrocks in the southwest corner of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument outside of Big Water, Utah. A toadstool is a spire like feature with a boulder perched atop a pedestal rock that formed when softer rock eroded leaving a dense column. (1/3)

©Rich Beckman

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The Toadstool Hoodoos, featuring the Red Toadstool, are part of the Paria Rimrocks in the southwest corner of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument outside of Big Water, Utah. A toadstool is a spire like feature with a boulder perched atop a pedestal rock that formed when softer rock eroded leaving a dense column. (2/3)

©Rich Beckman

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The Toadstool Hoodoos, featuring the Red Toadstool, are part of the Paria Rimrocks in the southwest corner of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument outside of Big Water, Utah. A toadstool is a spire like feature with a boulder perched atop a pedestal rock that formed when softer rock eroded leaving a dense column. (3/3)

©Rich Beckman

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The Wahweap Hoodoos are accessible via a 9.2 mile round-trip hike from Big Water, UT through the Wahweap Wash. Wahweap means “bitter water” in Paiute and refers to the alkaline seeps found along the canyon.

Hoodoos are eccentric columns of rock formed by differential weathering. The cap of these hoodoos is 100 million year old Dakota Sandstone and the columns are Entrada Sandstone that is 160 million years old. The Paiutes believed that hoodoos are the remnants of people who were turned to stone.

There are three coves of hoodoos along the wash. The first is known as Riverside Cove and is best viewed from the floor of the wash. The second, called Hoodoo Central, is in a recess on the canyon wall a third of a mile to the west and the third grouping, known as the Towers of Silence, is around a bend another third of a mile to the north. (1/3)

©Rich Beckman

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The Wahweap Hoodoos are accessible via a 9.2 mile round-trip hike from Big Water, UT through the Wahweap Wash. Wahweap means “bitter water” in Paiute and refers to the alkaline seeps found along the canyon.

Hoodoos are eccentric columns of rock formed by differential weathering. The cap of these hoodoos is 100 million year old Dakota Sandstone and the columns are Entrada Sandstone that is 160 million years old. The Paiutes believed that hoodoos are the remnants of people who were turned to stone.

There are three coves of hoodoos along the wash. The first is known as Riverside Cove and is best viewed from the floor of the wash. The second, called Hoodoo Central, is in a recess on the canyon wall a third of a mile to the west and the third grouping, known as the Towers of Silence, is around a bend another third of a mile to the north. (2/3)

©Rich Beckman

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The Wahweap Hoodoos are accessible via a 9.2 mile round-trip hike from Big Water, UT through the Wahweap Wash. Wahweap means “bitter water” in Paiute and refers to the alkaline seeps found along the canyon.

Hoodoos are eccentric columns of rock formed by differential weathering. The cap of these hoodoos is 100 million year old Dakota Sandstone and the columns are Entrada Sandstone that is 160 million years old. The Paiutes believed that hoodoos are the remnants of people who were turned to stone.

There are three coves of hoodoos along the wash. The first is known as Riverside Cove and is best viewed from the floor of the wash. The second, called Hoodoo Central, is in a recess on the canyon wall a third of a mile to the west and the third grouping, known as the Towers of Silence, is around a bend another third of a mile to the north. (3/3)

©Rich Beckman

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A couple practices yoga atop the Petrified Dunes in Snow Canyon State Park outside Ivins, Utah. Composed from the sediment of an ancient sea, the Navajo sandstone dunes rise more than 300 feet above the surrounding canyon floor.

©Rich Beckman